Archive for the ‘Email’ tag

How to find your email signature folder in Outlook

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…and how to edit it

If you use Outlook to send and receive emails, you’re probably also using the ’email signature’ facility that allows you to create a custom bit of text and images that appears at the end of the emails you write.

The problem is, the in-built email signature editor in Outlook is very basic! If you want to create something a bit more complex, sometimes the only option is to do it manually.

Each email signature is made up of three files – signature.rft, signature.html, and signature.txt. These are three different versions of the same signature but used for different types of emails, for example, plain text or rich text. (Note: where I’ve used the word ‘signature’ in the file names in this paragraph, for your email signature, it will be whatever you have named it e.g. ‘My Email Sig.txt’)

Together with these three files there is usually also a directory (aka folder) which contains the corresponding images.

If you can find these files, edit them manually, and save them as they are, you’ll be able to do a lot more in terms of layout and functionality than if you’re just editing these through the Outlook email signature editor.

Firstly, create the files (the signatures folder is created when the first email signature is saved):

  1. Open Outlook, click the ‘tools’ option from the top row of options, then click ‘options’ from the drop-down menu
  2. From the ‘Options’ dialogue box that pops up, click the ‘mail format’ tab then click ‘signatures’
  3. from within the ‘Signatures and stationery’ dialogue box, click ‘new’, give it a name, then press OK then save.
from within the 'Signatures and stationery' dialogue box, click 'new', give it a name, then press OK then save.

from within the ‘Signatures and stationery’ dialogue box, click ‘new’, give it a name, then press OK then save.

Now to edit the files:
To find these files we’ve just created:

  1. Go to file explorer – either press ‘Windows key’ + E or go to my computer
  2. Type ‘%APPDATA%’ (without the quotes) into the address bar at the top and press enter or from My Computer navigate from C: to ‘Users’, ‘Your user name’, ‘appdata’
  3. from ‘appdata’ click on ‘Microsoft’ then ‘signatures’ (please note this folder won’t exists until you’ve created your first email signature through Outlook)
Open the file explorer, and type '%APPDATA%' (without the quotes) into the address bar at the top then press enter

Open the file explorer, and type ‘%APPDATA%’ (without the quotes) into the address bar at the top then press enter

Go to file explorer - either press 'Windows key' + E or go to my computer

Go to file explorer – either press ‘Windows key’ + E or go to my computer

  • The text file can be easily edited using Notepad or similar. This is the signature that is included when the mail format is ‘plain text’ meaning you can’t have any pictures included and you have limited control over formatting and fonts.
  • The HTML file can be edited using Notepad if you know HTML, or alternatively, you may need a visual HTML editor to make changes.
  • The RTF file can be edited using MS Word or similar. The RTF anf HTML files are included when you send your email in rich text format
  • Don’t forget to stick to the hyperlink format and include any images you include in the respective folder within the signatures folder

Written by Chris

December 9th, 2013 at 5:27 pm

How to take a screen capture and send it by email

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This tutorial is about taking a shot of your computer screen and sending it – very useful when asking for technical support by email. This assumes you are using a PC and a local email client such as Outlook.

  1. Get whatever it is you’d like to get a screen capture of up on your screen
  2. Press the ‘PRTSC’ button. This is short for ‘Print Screen’ and will take a snapshot of your computer screen before sending it. Note: if you’re sending a screen capture of a website, you can press F11 to go full screen before taking the capture (press F11 again to exit full screen mode)

    PRTSC - press to take a screen capture

    PRTSC – press to take a screen capture

  3. Open your email client and open a new email
  4. With the cursor in the body of the email at the appropriate place, press and hold ‘CTRL’ then press ‘v’ once. This will paste the screen capture from your clipboard into the email.

    Insert screen capture into your email

    Insert screen capture into your email

Written by Chris

December 20th, 2012 at 10:28 am

553 sorry, that address is not in my list of allowed recipients email problem

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553 sorry, that address is not in my list of allowed recipients email problem

if you’re regularly getting emails bounced back to you with the error ‘553 sorry, that address is not in my list of allowed recipients’ this might help.

In our experience, the problem is usually down to a BT issue not allowing emails to be delivered.

If you’re using a BT internet connection and Outlook to send your mail, try this (click on the image for larger version):

Fix the 'address not on my list of allowed recipients' problem using Outlook

Fix the 'address not on my list of allowed recipients' problem using Outlook

Written by Chris

March 18th, 2011 at 9:42 am

Posted in Email,Tutorial

Tagged with , , ,

Most common causes for emails not going through

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Most common causes for emails not going through


Are the occasional emails not going through? Here are the most common causes

  • ‘Email address misspelt’ accounts for 99% of email delivery problems, in my experience. Check you have spelt the bit after the ‘@’ correctly first by copying the domain and pasting it into your browser address bar. If it doesn’t resolve to a website, it’s probably because of that
  • Carefully check the first part of the address is right (usually the recipient name). Some email accounts aren’t set up to catch misspelled email addresses so a simple extra ‘.’ In the name might mean the difference between being received or rejected
  • Following on from the previous points; is the domain extension right? Have you sent the email to ‘.co.uk’ when it should have gone to ‘.com’ instead?
  • Big attachments will cause many emails to be rejected. Many email addresses won’t accept attachments over 10MB. Try sending without the attachment
  • Check with your internet connection supplier. Some draconian setups from certain providers, who will remain nameless, put very heavy restrictions on sending email through their lines. On occasion, sending too many email triggers restrictions and in other instances, recipient’s domain names have had to be defined with them in advance
  • Firewalls and spam filters aren’t always particularly fond of emails that contain links, images and attachments (particularly executables). Even emails that are too short sometimes trigger spam filters. Try writing a plain text email with no attachments to see if this is the cause
  • If you’re using a mail server, such as Exchange, there is a chance that it is incorrectly configured. This has been the cause of several of our customer’s problems in the past.

If all of the steps above don’t work, try the following

  • Call the recipient and ask them to email you. Replying to their email means you take human error out of the equation
  • Email them from a different email account on a different server, e.g. Hotmail, Gmail or Yahoo Mail. This takes any potential SMPT error out of the equation

Still not working? Then it’s probably due to your emails being blocked or bounced by the recipients Spam filter. Contact their IT support and ask them to add your domain to their ‘safe senders’ or ‘white’ list

Written by Chris

February 28th, 2011 at 9:46 am

Posted in Tutorial

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A very simple guide to email on your portable devices (blackberry, iPhone, netbook etc.)

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Many people have asked recently about using their email on their portable devices and it’s actually quite simple once you understand a few of the main principles

Here’s how seven Creative’s email system works

Firstly, a few definitions:

  • Local email client – this is an application on your home or office computer for reading and sending emails. Common local email clients are Outlook and Thunderbird
  • Remote web-server – this is your web-mail account and is accessed through your web browser. Your received emails are stored here until you collect them using a local email client or delete them by logging into the web-mail directly
  • SMTP – stands for Simple Mail Transfer Protocol and is the system used when emails are SENT. It transfers the email from your out-box to the recipients in-box.
  • POP3 – stands for Post Office Protocol and is the system used by local email clients to retrieve emails from a remote web-server

If you’re using a local email client (see definitions), this is what happens when someone sends you an email:

This is what happens when someone sends you an email

This is what happens when someone sends you an email

Of course, you can log directly into your webmail account and reply to ‘Jim’ like this:

This is what happens when you reply to an email from your webmail account

This is what happens when you reply to an email from your webmail account

The problems with this system

This system works perfectly well when sending emails between computers, however, emails are commonly sent with very large attachments.

for example, Seven Creative’s email system allows you to send up-to 80 MB attachments which is obviously far too big to receive on a mobile phone or similar portable device! Firstly, portable devices tend to use the mobile network’s system for connecting to the internet which is very slow and most people are charged by the MB for this internet connection so it could be very expensive. Secondly, mobiles and portable devices are not designed for large attachments and storage is limited.

Surely, a better idea for mobile email would be to just give you a preview of the important bits of the email such as who it’s from, the text and the name of any attachments?

This is where IMAP comes in handy

IMAP stands for Internet Message Access Protocol and is used for reading mail on portable devices.

IMAP allows you to just download the message headers i.e. the title and the text. This then gives you the option of either replying, ignoring or deleteing the message (and by ‘deleting the message’ it means removing it directly from the web server without having to ever download the actual message)

The size of the header information will normally be just a few bytes so is quick and cheap to download and doesn’t take up much storage space on your portable device.

The best thing about IMAP, however, is that it never actually deletes or removes anything from the webserver unless you tell it to. This means you’ll never end up with duplicate messages or some messages on one computer and others on another, for example, you can connect to your inbox, read an email, reply to the sender and then when you get home, your email is still there on the web-server for you to download as normal

IMAP runs in parallel to your POP3 address allowing you to read emails from multiple devices while keeping them always in one place

IMAP will also work with Microsoft Exchange server, however, it really does start getting complicated then… 🙁

Using IMAP to read your emails on a portable device

Using IMAP to read your emails on a portable device

It’s a lot simpler than you think…

to start using your portable device to check your emails.

Let us know if you’d like to give it a go and we can supply you with IMAP and SMTP settings

Get in touch with us here

Written by Chris

February 25th, 2010 at 2:41 pm

Posted in Email,Software

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